London

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TastyChomps Mini Travel Guide Visit To London, England – Series
Part 1 – The Tourist Sights of London, England, including Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor Castle
Part 2 – Chowzter’s Global Fast Feast Awards 2014 in London, England
Part 3 – A Food Lovers’ Feast at London’s Borough Market and Broadway Market
Part 4 – London – Harrod’s Food Hall, Full English Breakfast, Fish and Chips, Tayyab’s

In our previous post, we explored London’s Borough and Broadway Markets. London has a rich food heritage that has evolved and changed with the tides of history. Don’t miss these four foodie places and dishes to try while visiting London.

Harrods – Food Halls

Whereas the East End of London has historically been known mostly for its huddled masses of the working class, on the other side of town, the West End has been known as the epicenter of luxury, filled with high end residential and commercial real estate, sitting close to the seat of power at Westminster Palace and just a few blocks away from Buckingham Palace.

It’s been said that the “City” of London where the financial district is centered is where the money is made, and the west of London is where it’s spent.

Today, luxury retail stores from Cartier to Louis Vuitton line the streets.

It’s no wonder that Harrod’s was built in the West End near Hyde Park just before the Great Exhibition of 1851. The store grew in popularity ever since and later, was sold to Egyptian businessman Mohamed Al-Fayed in the 1980s, and more recently in 2010, to Qatar’s royal family.

Mr. Al-Fayed brought Hayyad’s to the present day by making the department store world famous for selling high quality, luxury wares to locals and tourists alike, often bringing in celebrities to increase prestige and attract publicity.

The store today occupies a 5-acre site and has over one million square feet of selling space in over 330 departments making it the biggest department store in Europe.

The most popular floor, at least for our readers, would be the world famous Harrod’s Food Halls on the bottom floor, comprising of seven specialist departments in five rooms ranging from fish, meat, and poultry, confectionaries, chocolates, bakery, tea, coffee, wine, fromage (cheeses), fruits and vegetables. There are also sit down restaurants for weary shoppers and voracious food lovers alike that include an oyster bar, sushi, and even fresh steamed dim sum. The array is stunning.

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Harrod’s

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Beef Wellington
Beef Wellington
Salmon en croute
Salmon en croute
Chocolates
Chocolates
Oyster
Oyster

Fish Central

Fish and chips is one of the national dishes of England, consisting of battered fish, commonly Atlantic cod or haddock, and deep-fried chips (slices of potato wedges).

Fish and chips became a stock meal among the working classes in the United Kingdom as a consequence of the rapid development of trawl fishing in the North Sea, and the development of railways which connected the ports to major industrial cities during the second half of the 19th century, which meant that fresh fish could be rapidly transported to the heavily populated areas.

In chip shops in the United Kingdom and Ireland, salt and vinegar is traditionally sprinkled over fish and chips at the time it is served.

Succulent and fresh, the cod at Fish Central is full of thick, white juicy flakes and a nice crispy batter on the outside. Truly, the golden standard of fish and chips in London.

 

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The friendly fellow folks at Chowzter! Getting ready for an amazing presentation from Scott Wink of North Carolina.

Fried and battered fish hush puppies and anchovies
Fried and battered fish hush puppies and anchovies

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Traditional condiments from salt and vinegar to tartar sauce
Traditional condiments from salt and vinegar to tartar sauce
Fish and Chips at Fish Central - truly wonderful
Fish and Chips at Fish Central – truly wonderful

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Chef and proprietor of Fish Central
Chef and proprietor of Fish Central

 

Fish Central on Urbanspoon

The Breakfast Club

A full English breakfast, also known as a “fry-up” as nearly everything in this dish is fried in a pan, is regarded as a staple of traditional British and Irish cuisine. Many British and Irish cafés and pubs serve the meal at any time as an “all-day breakfast”. There are also regional variations like the full Scottish, full Welsh, full Irish and the Ulster fry including local dishes in the breakfast .A traditional full English breakfast includes bacon (traditionally back bacon), poached or fried eggs, fried or grilled tomatoes, fried mushrooms, fried bread or toast with butter, sausage, black pudding, and baked beans.

I had the best rendition of a full English Breakfast at The Breakfast Club, off of a side street in Hoxton. The Breakfast Club felt like a hipster’s version of a diner, very cozy and comfortable place to dine in with nice servers and overall, friendly atmosphere.

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THE FULL MONTY
Bacon, sausage, black pudding, eggs, home-style fried potatoes, mushrooms, beans, grilled tomato and toasted multigrain bloomer 10.00

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Breakfast Club on Urbanspoon

Tayyab’s

Indian restaurants abound in London, particularly along the “Brick Lane” area. As it has gotten more touristy in recent years, some visitors have left wondering if they are still trying. It might be better to broaden the search for great Indian food outside of the famous Curry Brick Lane.

Founded in 1972, Tayyab’s is a family owned and run business in Whitechapel serving the finest in Punjabi cuisine. The food comes from the Punjab state in Northern India and Pakistan, and many of the dishes at Tayyab’s have a Pakistani flair to them – characterized by less saucy curries and more dry spices.

Just a few short blocks from the Tube station for Whitechapel (which may seem to be longer than normal in the rain), Tayyabs is off a rather unassuming street filled with kabob shops and other fast to go spots for the working man in this mostly South Asian neighborhood.

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Bright blue neon lights up the Tayyab’s sign and outside the black painted building a line starts to form. You always know a good time will be had when you see a line forming for food.

Inside, the restaurant itself is rather large with multiple levels for dining. We are seated inside next to a small party of friends. It’s BYOB here at Tayyab’s and some have brought their own bottles of wine and beer, with no corkage fees.

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The room is noisy, rowdy, filled with sizzling plates of chicken and lamb dishes. The ambiance was quite modern and chic, a little dark.

Service was not up to par, but I am accustomed to that now at most ethnic restaurants, sad to say. I know with Chinese culture at least, the restaurant business is not about the service, but about the food quality and how fast you can get in and out.

So I guess I shouldn’t have been a surprise to find our waiter missing for most of the meal, but at least, the few times we did see him he was pleasant. The thing that irked me the most was that it took me about four tries with four different waiters to finally get my bill to pay and by the end of it, I’d much rather have just got up and looked for the manager to sort it out and save the precious time.

On to the food, which was rather delightful and surprisingly different from what I’ve been accustom to in Orlando.

Naan bread, nice flavors from the garlic
Naan bread, nice flavors from the garlic

For an appetizer, I chose the signature Lamb Chops, a generous portion of savory, grilled lamb with red spices similar to a lamb chop tandoori style. Fabulous, and fun to eat with your hands.

Lamb chops, a great deal
Lamb chops, a great deal

The menu also features a selection of traditional Pakistani “Karahi” dishes cooked in a circular wok-like black metal dish called “karahi.” Each dish is simmered and prepared with spices and caramelized onions. The Karahi chicken tikka masala, for example, was found to be a little sweeter and a lot less “saucy” as the version found in other Indian restaurants, cooked almost dry with a little oil on the bottom of the dish and a combination of tomatoes, onions, chills, and I believe pineapple. If you told me that was chicken tikka masala, I would not have believed it from what I’ve tried before, so it was gratifying to see a different version of this popular “British” dish.

Overall, I would definitely return for the great dishes as well as the excellent price point and value. I believe it was the cheapest meal I had in London with the whole meal coming under 35£s. Would go again.

Tayyab's Karahi Chicken Tikka Masala
Tayyab’s Karahi Chicken Tikka Masala
Chicken Karahi and Karahi Chicken Tikka Masala
Chicken Karahi and Karahi Chicken Tikka Masala

Tayyabs on Urbanspoon

TastyChomps Mini Travel Guide Visit To London, England – Series
Part 1 – The Tourist Sights of London, England, including Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor Castle
Part 2 – Chowzter’s Global Fast Feast Awards 2014 in London, England
Part 3 – A Food Lovers’ Feast at London’s Borough Market and Broadway Market
Part 4 – London – Harrod’s Food Hall, Full English Breakfast, Fish and Chips, Tayyab’s

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TastyChomps Mini Travel Guide Visit To London, England – Series
Part 1 – The Tourist Sights of London, England, including Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor Castle
Part 2 – Chowzter’s Global Fast Feast Awards 2014 in London, England
Part 3 – A Food Lovers’ Feast at London’s Borough Market and Broadway Market
Part 4 – London – Harrod’s Food Hall, Full English Breakfast, Fish and Chips, Tayyab’s

The vibrant Borough Market, London’s most popular food market, has been getting a bit too touristy these days with all the recent publicity – long lines are not so uncommon, but I suppose that is a boon to the farmers, producers, and vendors there.

Meanwhile, the more casual, and less crowded, Broadway Market, on the east end of London in Hackney, is equally as much a food lovers’ paradise as Borough Market in many ways. Do visit them both.

Borough Market

London’s most renowned food market is known as a source of exceptional British and international produce, providing a haven for purveyors, chefs, and home cooks who care about quality food.

Borough has long been synonymous with food markets and as far back as the 11th century, London Bridge attracted traders selling grain, fish, vegetables and livestock.

Many of the over 100 vendors and stallholders at Borough Market are themselves producers – people who grow, rear or bake the food that they sell. Others are importers with intimate knowledge of whichever corner of the globe they source their products from.

Producers from all over the country bring a range of fresh produce to the market, including fish, meats, vegetables, ciders, cheeses, breads, coffees, cakes and patisseries. Other stalls specialize in produce imported from abroad.

Scenes from the wonderful Borough Market follow…

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Bread jenga
Bread jenga

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Freshly cooked paella of all sorts of flavors from Thai panang to traditional
Freshly cooked paella of all sorts of flavors from Thai panang to traditional

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Meat Pies, a staple in London
Meat Pies, a staple in London

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Spanish provisions
Spanish provisions

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Portugese egg tarts
Portugese egg tarts

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The Ginger Pig's famous sausage roll - one of the best I've had in London
The Ginger Pig’s famous sausage roll – one of the best I’ve had in London

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Portugese style whole hog
Portugese style whole hog
Lovely baklavas
Lovely baklavas

 

Broadway Market

East London, particular the artsy, digital media, Shoreditch area, is becoming more and more hip and chic each day.

The oft storied home to the working class of Charles Dickens’ Industrial England, East London has been a place of new immigrants and the poor for centuries, from the Jewish immigrants up until the 1950s, then immigrants from the Indian subcontinent (transforming Brick Lane to the “Curry” Brick Lane), and now, more and more immigrants of the high tech hipster variety moving in with boutiques and bistros. The area continues to be a transformative place for London’s working class today.

Broadway Market in East London dates back to the mid 19th century when it earned a reputation for providing fresh meat and poultry. Despite ups and downs through the years, today it’s a thriving weekly market with fabulous restaurants making a name for itself as a ‘chic’ with its diverse range of fine foods, designer clothing, organic fair trade products, health product and crafts.

The market runs the gamut of food stalls, shops, pubs, restaurants and cafes offering some of the best food and most original clothing in London all crammed into a little East End street between the Regent’s Canal and London Fields in the London Borough of Hackney.

The purveyors sell organic meat, fruit and vegetables; fresh fish and smoked salmon and oysters; delicious bread, cakes and cheese.

Nearby, a few standing food stalls like permanent food trucks offer up some of the best street food in London.

Broadway Market, bustling
Broadway Market, bustling

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Salmon bagels
Salmon bagels

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Live musicians at Broadway Market
Live musicians at Broadway Market
Japanese earthquake relief fundraisers
Japanese earthquake relief fundraisers

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Scotch eggs - chorizo to all types of meats
Scotch eggs – chorizo to all types of meats

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Justin Mellott of Chowzter, pensive
Justin Mellott of Chowzter, pensive

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A Turkish lady and man make gozlenes, kind of a Turkish roti stuffed with cheese and spinach
A Turkish lady and man make gozlenes, kind of a Turkish roti stuffed with cheese and spinach
Gozlenes, kind of a Turkish roti stuffed with cheese and spinach
Gozlenes, kind of a Turkish roti stuffed with cheese and spinach

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The Mr Musubi guys - follow them on twitter and facebook
The Mr Musubi guys – follow them on twitter and facebook
Mr Musubi of Broadway market
Mr Musubi of Broadway market

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Love the musubi guys! the wild mushroom musubi was one of the best things I ate in London
Love the musubi guys! the wild mushroom musubi was one of the best things I ate in London

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A Turkish lady making gozlenes, kind of a Turkish roti stuffed with cheese and spinach
A Turkish lady making gozlenes, kind of a Turkish roti stuffed with cheese and spinach

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F. Cooke’s

Cockney cuisine is thought of as the East London working man’s food consisting of mostly puddings, meat pies, mashed potatoes, and jellied eels drenched in green parsley “liquor” sauce.

Once upon a time, eels, pie and mash was a staple diet of workers in London’s East End, with over 200 shops to choose from; now there are only a handful.

Fred Cooke started selling jellied eels in Broadway Market in 1900. His restaurant, F. Cooke, served shepherds driving their flocks to the City of London. The decor probably hasn’t changed much since its opening in the early 1900s, with walls lined with porcelain tiles and wooded mirrors.

Locals get a plate of the eels (though they are now seen as endangered) served with mashed potatoes, meat pies, all lathered in the green parsley sauce for a cheap price. It was seen as a cheap, nutritious meal for the working class in days gone by, but with the proliferation of fast food restaurants, the pie and mash and eel shops have gone by the way side.

May be it will pick up again with a more adventurous dining clientele on the rise.

The eels, white, slippery, slender cylinders of fish meat, served with gelatin, was not my first choice of preparation for eel, it was rather slimey for me but the taste was good.

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Mr. Robert (Bob) Cooke, Grandson of the original F. Cooke at the helm
Mr. Robert (Bob) Cooke, Grandson of the original F. Cooke at the helm
Jellied eels with gelatin
Jellied eels with gelatin

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F. Cooke on Urbanspoon

TastyChomps Mini Travel Guide Visit To London, England – Series
Part 1 – The Tourist Sights of London, England, including Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor Castle
Part 2 – Chowzter’s Global Fast Feast Awards 2014 in London, England
Part 3 – A Food Lovers’ Feast at London’s Borough Market and Broadway Market
Part 4 – London – Harrod’s Food Hall, Full English Breakfast, Fish and Chips, Tayyab’s

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TastyChomps Mini Travel Guide Visit To London, England – Series
Part 1 – The Tourist Sights of London, England, including Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor Castle
Part 2 – Chowzter’s Global Fast Feast Awards 2014 in London, England
Part 3 – A Food Lovers’ Feast at London’s Borough Market and Broadway Market
Part 4 – London – Harrod’s Food Hall, Full English Breakfast, Fish and Chips, Tayyab’s

This past weekend, I attended Chowzter’s 2014 Tastiest Fast Feast in the World Awards on Sunday, April 28th in London. Sponsored by Coca-Cola, the Second Annual Chowzter World Awards aimed to find the tastiest fast feast around the globe, taking place at London’s L’Anima Cafe to announce the winners of the world’s very best dishes.

Orlando’s very own Hanamizuki Japanese restaurant (whose Kyoto-style chef was once a cook for the royal family in Japan) had an entree in the esteemed awards, with its Shio Butter Ramen noodle soup dish nominated as one of the top five very best noodle dishes in the world. But alas, our noodle dish was defeated by the formidable Pad Thai at Pad Thai Thip Simai in Bangkok, Thailand.

It was revealed that a simple Ceviche dish from the tiny Chez Wong restaurant in Lima was the overall winner of ‘the tastiest item in the world’. Javier Wong’s tiny restaurant in one room of his house gets reserved months in advance for one of seven tables at Wong’s, this reservation only restaurant has no menu and serves ceviche only ever made from Pacific sole.

Bangkok was announced as the world’s foodiest city and fought off stiff competition from the shortlisted cities: London, Lima, Singapore and Vancouver.

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Jeffrey Merrihue of Chowzter.com

Winners from each main food categories (pizzas, seafood, noodles, rice, sandwiches, bird and baked item) spanned all corners of the globe, and winners included the Di Fara’s pizza slice from Brooklyn, Singaporean Chicken Rice dish and the fried jam croissant from London’s very own Albion cafe in East London. Awards were also awarded to the best dishes which represented four regions of the world: best in Europe; North America; Latin America and Asia.

Chief Chowzters from around the World
Chief Chowzters from around the World

Winners were chosen by the Chowzter team and top food bloggers, the ‘Chief Chowzters’, who travelled the globe tasting and testing the entries, as well as the bloggers themselves who battled it out to argue the case for their personal favourites via online debate. The party was attended by an international audience of foodies and guests feasted on an array of delicious dishes including suckling pig devised by Francesca Mazzei’s soon to open L’Anima Cafe in the city.

Click here for the full list of 2014 Chowzter Fast Feast Award winners!

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Media Coverage for the 2014 Chowzter Global Fast Feast Awards

L'Anima Cafe in London - Whole Roast Pig - Porchetta
L’Anima Cafe in London – Whole Roast Pig – Porchetta

Chowzter’s Global Steak Symposium

On the Saturday prior to the Awards event, the Chief Chowzters visited London’s Flat Iron steakhouse in Soho to attend a Global Steak Symposium by Mark Schatzker, author of Steak: One Man’s Search for the World’s Tastiest Beef.

On his world wide journey, Mark discovered that rather than breed or marbleization of the beef that tended to skew its “tastiness” factor, it was actually what the beef was fed. This is why it is so important to have grass-fed rather than corn or grain fed beef to maximize taste.

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The restaurant is a bit tight and cozy, spanning 3 floors with nice wooden floors and 6 seat tables.

What’s notable about Flat Iron steakhouse, run by Chef Charlie Carroll, is that it is one of the few, if only, London restaurants that provide expertly cooked, mouth-watering, grass-fed Flat Iron steak with house salad for just £10. No wonder they take no reservations.

We blind-tasted and rated the 6 steaks based on their juiciness, taste, and finish, among other things. Here is what the scorecard looked like:

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The steaks were numbered 1 through 6 and their identities were later revealed to be:

1- New Zealand Grass Fed Wagyu
2- USDA Prime
3- Australian Barley OZ Black Angus
4- McKie, Scottish Highland, Grass Fed
5- Highland Island from Yorkshire:
6- Grade A5, Wagyu, Japan

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And the winning steak was Steak #5, a Highland bred beef, over 30 months old, fed apple and grains, and beer finished with beer from Farmer Charles Ashbridge. It was also, with a sigh of relief, my personal choice for best steak – full of deep, lasting flavors and many different notes ranging from sweet to bitter. Glad to have my tastebuds validated.

Istanbul Chief Chowzter Tuba Satana with Farmer Charles Ashbridge, owner of the winning steak
Istanbul Chief Chowzter Tuba Satana with Farmer Charles Ashbridge, owner of the winning steak
Flat Iron's Chef Charlie Carroll
Flat Iron’s Chef Charlie Carroll

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Flat Iron on Urbanspoon

TastyChomps Mini Travel Guide Visit To London, England – Series
Part 1 – The Tourist Sights of London, England, including Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor Castle
Part 2 – Chowzter’s Global Fast Feast Awards 2014 in London, England
Part 3 – A Food Lovers’ Feast at London’s Borough Market and Broadway Market
Part 4 – London – Harrod’s Food Hall, Full English Breakfast, Fish and Chips, Tayyab’s

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TastyChomps Mini Travel Guide Visit To London, England – Series
Part 1 – The Tourist Sights of London, England, including Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor Castle
Part 2 – Chowzter’s Global Fast Feast Awards 2014 in London, England
Part 3 – A Food Lovers’ Feast at London’s Borough Market and Broadway Market
Part 4 – London – Harrod’s Food Hall, Full English Breakfast, Fish and Chips, Tayyab’s

I traveled over the pond recently to visit our cousins in the United Kingdom, more specifically, London, England to represent Orlando at the Chowzter Global Fast Feasts Award.

During my visit, I used some of the extra time to travel the English countryside and visit Windsor Castle, the Roman Baths, and Stonehenge through the Evan Evans Tour.

The tour was quite fabulous, in large part to our very friendly tour guide, Mark, and lasting about 12 hours and covering almost 300 miles.

Windsor Castle

A look at the keep at Windsor Castle
A look at the keep at Windsor Castle

Just 30 minutes outside of London, Windsor Castle is the oldest and largest inhabited castle in the world. It has been the family home of British kings and queens for almost 1,000 years.

The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and it is the longest-occupied palace in Europe.

Queen Elizabeth II still uses Windsor Castle as her “home away from home” even today and on our particular visit, she was in residence as evidenced by the flying flag above the castle’s keep (the strongest, most central tower of the castle).

On reaching Windsor Castle’s railway station, you walk through a shopping arcade with a few eateries and gift shops until you reach the main entrance line for the Windsor Castle. Once inside, you can walk through the exhibition areas (on this visit it was Queen Mary’s Doll House collection) and then walk through the “State Apartments”, various palatial dining rooms and bedrooms and such that were constructed to rival the ones found at Versailles in France. It reminded me a bit of our White House in Washington, D.C., except much more grand and larger.

The train at the Windsor castle railway station
The train at the Windsor castle railway station

Roman Baths in Bath

Roman Bath
Roman Bath

The first shrine at the site of the hot springs was built by the Celts thousands of years ago, and continued to be used after the Roman invasion, leading to the town’s Roman name of Aquae Sulis (“the waters of Sulis”), after the goddess Sulis, identified as Minerva among the Romans.

The temple was constructed in 60-70 AD and the bathing complex was gradually built up over the next 300 years.

After the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the first decade of the 5th century, the Roman baths fell into disrepair and were eventually lost due to silting up and flooding.

The baths were later found in the 1800s and reconstructed to the museum you see today. The water inside the bath is not safe to swim in or drink, but they do have a potable water fountain inside the museum that lets you taste the spring water (it tasted rather metallic, probably not recommended).

I really loved the unique architecture here at the city of bath, crafted from light brown stones. The city of Bath became popular as a spa town during the Georgian era (1700s), leaving a heritage of Georgian architecture crafted from Bath Stone, and was often the setting for Jane Austen novels.

Today, this sleepy town is still known for quaint shops and street performances.

A street performer in statuesque form outside of the Roman Bath
A street performer in statuesque form outside of the Roman Bath
Roman Baths
Entrance to the Roman Baths
Roman Baths
The Roman Baths
Roman Baths with statues of famous Roman emperors surrounding the top area
Roman Baths with statues of famous Roman emperors surrounding the top area
A Roman guard stands in wait at the Roman Baths
A “Roman guard” stands in wait at the Roman Baths – his hand is raised to signify he is unarmed and comes in peace.

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Beautiful architecture at bath, notice the lovely stone
Beautiful architecture at bath, notice the lovely stone
Architecture at Bath
Architecture at Bath

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Famous Cornish meat pies
Famous Cornish meat pies
Cornish meatpie, looks a bit like an empanada - quite tasty
Cornish meatpie, looks a bit like an empanada – quite tasty
Cornish meatpie
Cornish meatpie filled with lamb and potatoes

Stonehenge

A view at Stonehenge
A view at Stonehenge

One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is the remains of a ring of standing stones set within earthworks, built anywhere from 3000 BC to 2000 BC.

It pre-dates the druids by several thousand years, but we still have pre-conceived notions that it was used for ancient druid rituals.

Archaelogists still do not know for certain what the area was used for, some say a marketplace, some say an early form of Parliament where the people would come to pass laws and judgement, and still others say Stonehenge was some sort religious sacred ground.

One thing for certain is that it was an important site for burials of important people, evidenced by hundreds of elaborate burial mounds found within eye sight of the complex.

My guess, it was a gate way of some sort – maybe to the stars.

A view at Stonehenge
A view at Stonehenge
A view at Stonehenge
A view at Stonehenge
A view at Stonehenge
A view at Stonehenge
This thing is heavy
This rock thing is heavy

The Tower of London

Traitors' Gate
Traitors’ Gate

Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London, is a historic castle on the north bank of the River Thames in central London.

It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England by William the Conqueror, and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite.

I could imagine the horror stories of all the executions, public and not so public, that have occurred throughout the years. It’s said that when they dug up the floor beneath the cathedral here, over 3000 bodies were found. Many of whom probably served the kingdom well, and others, who may have been a bit less fortunate like the wives of King Henry VIII.

The Tower has also served variously as an armoury, a prison, a treasury, a menagerie, the home of the Royal Mint, a public records office, and the home of the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom. From the early 14th century until the reign of Charles II, a procession would be led from the Tower to Westminster Abbey on the coronation of a monarch.

The peak period of the castle’s use as a prison was the 16th and 17th centuries, when many figures who had fallen into disgrace, such as Elizabeth I before she became queen, were held within its walls. This use has led to the phrase “sent to the Tower”.

The majority of the Tower of London was used as an armory with a whole museum dedicated to knight’s armor and cannons and guns to defend the castle, and consequently the entirety of London. No wonder they stored the Crown Jewels here.

The Crown Jewels were absolutely stunning, from the crown to the scepters, they were all very opulent and regal.

The White Tower where the king lived inside the Tower of London
The White Tower where the king lived inside the Tower of London
A Guard stands at Windsor Castle
A Guard stands at Windsor Castle
Where they keep the Crown Jewels at the Tower of London
Where they keep the Crown Jewels at the Tower of London
A View of the Tower Bridge inside the White Tower at the Tower of London
A View of the Tower Bridge inside the White Tower at the Tower of London
Tower Bridge (not London Bridge, which is much plainer)
Tower Bridge (not London Bridge, which is much plainer)
The Millenium Eye
The Millenium Eye
Big Ben, the Palace of Westminster - home of the 2 Houses of Parliament
Big Ben, the Palace of Westminster – home of the 2 Houses of Parliament
London's famous black taxi cabs
London’s famous black taxi cabs
Trafalgar Square, named after the 1805 British victory
Trafalgar Square, named after the 1805 British victory
Staring up the lion statue towards the sky and Nelson's column at Trafalgar Square, which commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars over France and Spain
Staring up the lion statue towards the sky and Nelson’s column at Trafalgar Square, which commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars over France and Spain
Actor Tate Donovan after shooting for 24: Live Another Day in London near Trafalgar Square. He's also the voice of Hercules in the Disney animated film.
Actor Tate Donovan after shooting for 24: Live Another Day in London near Trafalgar Square. He’s also the voice of Hercules in the Disney animated film.
A troop marches down the way with band in tow for The Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace
A troop marches down the way with band in tow for The Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace
Gates at Buckingham Palace
Gates at Buckingham Palace

TastyChomps Mini Travel Guide Visit To London, England – Series
Part 1 – The Tourist Sights of London, England, including Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor Castle
Part 2 – Chowzter’s Global Fast Feast Awards 2014 in London, England
Part 3 – A Food Lovers’ Feast at London’s Borough Market and Broadway Market
Part 4 – London – Harrod’s Food Hall, Full English Breakfast, Fish and Chips, Tayyab’s

For more of London’s stunning attractions, check out on Where to Stay in London: The Ultimate Sightseeing Guide by HotelsCombined.

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